Measure PCC Fact Sheet

Maintaining Affordable, High-Quality Education and Job Training

Pasadena City College (PCC) has provided high-quality, affordable college education and career training to local students in the San Gabriel Valley for almost 100 years. Offering a wide range of undergraduate degrees, university-transfer courses, certificate programs, career and technical education, PCC provides affordable access to the education and job training students need to succeed and the skilled workers needed to fuel our local economy.

Affordable Access to Higher Education

With the rising cost of four-year colleges and universities, thousands of local students rely on community colleges like PCC for affordable higher education at a fraction of the cost of Cal State, University of California (UC) and private universities. PCC ensures that lower and middle-income students who can’t afford the high price of a university still have an opportunity to succeed in college and careers. In fact, PCC delivers the highest transfer rate to UC and Cal State among all community colleges in California. The college’s satellite campuses bring these benefits to residents throughout the west San Gabriel Valley.

Training Essential Workers

Many local nurses, firefighters, paramedics, police officers, and other first-responders receive their education and job training at PCC. In addition to training healthcare and public safety workers, PCC is a vital economic engine for our region, creating thousands of jobs and generating nearly $600 million per year in total economic benefits for local workers and businesses.

Aging Classrooms, Labs and Job Training Facilities

While PCC has served the community for decades, most college facilities were built over 50 years ago and need repairs and upgrades for safety and to continue serving students. Some classrooms were built so long ago that they have asbestos, lead pipes, and do not meet current earthquake safety standards. PCC has prepared a detailed Facilities Master Plan (FMP) that evaluates the condition of all college facilities, identifies needed improvements and provides a plan to upgrade classrooms over the next 10 to 15 years.

Measure PCC: Locally-Controlled Funding for College Upgrades

To repair and upgrade aging college facilities, PCC must identify local funding sources. The College Board of Trustees has voted to place Measure PCC, a facilities improvement bond measure on the November 8, 2022 ballot.

If approved by 55% of voters, Measure PCC would provide funding to::

  • Repair or replace leaky roofs, old rusty plumbing and faulty electrical systems
  • Keep computer systems and instructional technology up-to-date
  • Upgrade classrooms, labs and career training facilities for science, technology, engineering, math and computer science
  • Improve access for students and veterans with disabilities
  • Repair or replace outdated electrical, water and irrigation systems to improve energy efficiency and water conservation
  • Establish permanent satellite campuses in areas around the region
  • Remove hazardous materials like asbestos and lead pipes from older buildings
  • Retrofit older buildings to make them earthquake safe

Fiscal Accountability and Independent Oversight

Measure PCC includes a clear system of accountability, including:

  • A project list detailing exactly how the funds would be used
  • A Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits to ensure the funds would be spent properly
  • A requirement that all funds raised would stay local and no funds could be taken away by the State
Your Feedback is Important to Us
PCC welcomes your comments and questions as it evaluates the needs of our local community college. Please complete our online survey to share your priorities for Pasadena City College.
Share your priorities for PCC

Measure PCC Frequently Asked Questions

Pasadena City College (PCC) has provided high-quality, affordable education and career training to our students for almost 100 years. Offering a wide range of undergraduate degrees, university-transfer courses, certificate programs and career and technical education, PCC provides affordable access to the education and job training students need to succeed and the skilled workers needed to fuel our local economy.

With the rising cost of four-year college, many students are turning to community college for local higher education at a fraction of the cost of Cal State, University of California (UC) and private universities. This requires providing up to date classrooms, labs and technology to meet the growing demand for education to help students complete the first two years of college affordably and transfer to Cal State or UC systems, and job and trade skills training programs for students entering careers.

Yes. PCC delivers the highest transfer rate to Cal State and UC among all community colleges in California. The College’s satellite campuses bring these benefits to residents throughout the west San Gabriel Valley.

Most of PCC’s facilities were built over 50 years ago and have never been upgraded. In addition to making basic repairs such as fixing leaky roofs, replacing old rusty plumbing and faulty electrical systems, there is a clear need to upgrade classrooms, instructional technology and career training facilities to better prepare students for in-demand jobs in science, healthcare, nursing, engineering and skilled trades.

To repair and upgrade aging college facilities, PCC must identify local funding sources. The College Board of Trustees has placed Measure PCC, a college facilities improvement bond measure, on the November 8, 2022 ballot.

The State provides very limited funding for improvements to community college facilities. Local funding is needed to address these needs at our school and keep providing a high-quality education to local students and veterans for job and university transfer.

  • Repairing or replacing leaky roofs, old rusty plumbing, faulty electrical systems and dry rotted beams
  • Removing hazardous materials like asbestos and lead pipes
  • Keeping computer systems and instructional technology up-to-date
  • Upgrading aging classrooms, labs, instructional technology and career-training facilities for science, engineering, math, technology and computer science
  • Improving access for students and veterans with disabilities
  • Establishing permanent satellite campuses in areas around the region
  • Improving energy efficiency and water conservation
  • Retrofitting older building to improve earthquake safety

Measure PCC would generate $565 million in locally controlled funding for improvements to college facilities and cost property owners $25 per $100,000 of assessed (not market) value of properties.

Measure PCC includes a clear system of accountability:

  • A project list detailing exactly how the funds would be used
  • A requirement that every penny raised by a local measure must be spent in Pasadena to improve our local community college facilities
  • A Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits to ensure the funds would be spent properly

No. Every penny from Measure PCC would stay local to support our local college. None of the funds could be taken away by the State.

Measure PCC will appear on the November 2022 ballot.

For more information or to learn more please contact Pasadena City College President, Erika Endrijonas, Ph.D. at pccprez@pasadena.edu with any questions or feedback.